By reading puppy training books can one successfully train and breed dogs

No.

  1. Dog training is a hands-on sport. Can you learn to play football from books? Can you learn to ballroom dance from a book? No? Then why do you expect to be able to learn the nuance, timing, instinctive reactions, and muscle memory that would make you a half-decent puppy trainer from one?
  2. Dog training and puppy breeding are not the same thing. Are all elementary school teachers also OBGYNs? No? Then why do you expect books on training dogs to teach you about breeding them?

I highly recommend finding a local training class with a trainer that is either training working dogs or competing at high levels with their own dogs (i.e. they have an Obedience Trial Championship or a Senior Herding or a IPO 3 or a Master Hunter title on at least one dog). Then I highly recommend taking another class from a different trainer with a different training philosophy.

Keep asking yourself “what is working for which dogs? why is it working for them? when do I think this method/tool/technique would and wouldn’t work for other dogs? why?”

Wow, this is a tough question to answer. There are various factors such as someones ability to retain and apply information that they read. The question you answered would actually be two different books. One on training, which is what I wrote. The second about breeding dogs.

I have trained a lot of dogs Nelson (Over 3,000) with that being said when you say “successfully train dogs” I am missing the part about what you would want a dog to be trained to do. Basic obedience, scent work, confirmation, agility etc….. I will assume you are referring to basic obedience. If that is the case my book does teach that and more. For example, “Give Dogs a Job, Reading Body Language and How to Teach Tricks” are just a few things I teach in my book.

I am aware that not everyone’s learning style is via reading a book. Therefore, I am creating an audiobook as we speak and eCourses on how to train various behavioral topics. Don’t take my word for it, experience “The Canine Connection: A Training Guide for Owners who Love their Dogs”, here is a link.http://www.thecanineconnection.care/products/

It’s never too late to train a dog. Whether you are bringing home an older dog from a shelter (or rescue), or you’d like to work with your own older dog, there’s no reason to delay doing some training with an older dog. … Older dogs may already know some commands. They have a much longer attention span than puppies. Yes, it’s okay to cover your dog with a blanket. The blanket is a source of warmth, comfort, and will add value to your dog’s life immediately. Just like humans, dogs don’t mind having something warm wrapped around their bodies at night. … Using a dog blanket to keep your dog warm is a no-brainer. Go to my Profile and you can find all about Dog Training material there…

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Personal life. Brandon lives bi-coastally between Los Angeles and New York City. He is the author of “Lucky Dog Lessons: Train Your Dog in 7 Days” (HarperCollins), which is a self-help book for dog lovers. Personal life. Brandon lives bi-coastally between Los Angeles and New York City. He is the author of “Lucky Dog Lessons: Train Your Dog in 7 Days” (HarperCollins), which is a self-help book for dog lovers. Go to my Profile and you can find all about Dog Training material there…

By reading only, nope.

You have to apply what you learned and then you will figure out how some things work for one dog will not work for another.

But reading is always a good start.